Coronavirus Through the Eyes of a Child

Coronavirus through the eyes of a childMany adults are feeling a lot of anxiety today – about their jobs, about their health, about the economy and about the unknown. But, what does it look like to see Coronavirus through the eyes of a child. Some of the authors at Slate.com asked their kids to share what they thought about the Covid-19 pandemic.

Some themes are common:

  • The change to online school and missing friends is difficult.
  • They understand that adults are worried.
  • It has disrupted their lives.
  • They are worried about the adults in their lives.
  • They have questions.
  • They are experiencing a multitude of emotions.

Here are few of my favorite quotes from the article that offer up a glimpse of what many kids are experiencing these days.

Nine-year-old Sam writes:

All this stuff about the coronavirus is really weird….My dad came in from a run and said, “There’s nobody out on the streets.” I feel like it’s getting very chaotic, you know, everything closing. My parents are worried that the stores and restaurants we like will go out of business.

Naima, who is also nine, shared:

Yesterday my mom was going to go to the grocery store. And she didn’t really want me to come because it was dangerous. But my stepmom has a fever so I couldn’t go to my dad’s house. So my mom had to take me to the store. She said for me to keep my hands in my pockets and I shouldn’t touch anything at all. Mom had to wipe down the cart before she used it. Usually I help my mom out with putting the food on the little conveyor belt thing so it can get checked out. But she said that I shouldn’t help her this time.

Ten-year-old Julia wrote:

Here are the three things I’m feeling most: curious, bored, and annoyed. You probably couldn’t imagine how many times people constantly tell me, “Wash your hands, don’t touch your face, and stay away from people who look sick or are coughing.” Like I don’t know to do these things. I also have questions, though, like: Who was the first person to get the coronavirus? How did he/she get it? Also, can you spread it by tears? For example, if you cry into a stuffed animal, and your friend hugs it, would any germs spread?

Eleven-year-old Elliot wrote:

Even on days where I do go outside, barely anyone talks or looks at one another. It is as if everything and everyone is a ghost.

Ten-year-old Simon explains:

The coronavirus is a very serious thing and you have to be very cautious around people. When I first heard about this I said, “Oh, no big deal, it’s all the way across the ocean.” And now I feel overwhelmed.

Naima, who we met above, shared probably my favorite observation though:

Everyone’s stocking up on toilet paper and I don’t get why.

You can find the original article here.

For more information and resources related to Covid-19, please visit our Covid-19 (Coronavirus) Resource Page.
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Written by Wayne Stocks
Wayne is the founder and executive director of Hope 4 Hurting Kids. He is a happily married father of four kids with a passion for helping young people who are going through rough times. In addition to Hope 4 Hurting Kids, Wayne previously started I Am A Child of Divorce and Divorce Ministry 4 Kids to help kids who are dealing with the disruption of their parents' relationship. These are now part of Hope 4 Hurting Kids. Wayne speaks frequently at conferences and churches on issues related to helping kids learn to deal with difficult emotions and life in modern families. Wayne lives with his wife, three youngest kids, three dogs and an insane collection of his kids' other pets outside of Columbus, Ohio. In addition to his work with Hope 4 Hurting Kids, Wayne is a partner in a local consulting firm, an avid reader, coaches his son's soccer team and is a proud supporter of Leicester City Football Club (and yes, for those in know, his affinity for the club does predate the 2016 championship). You can reach Wayne at wayne@hope4hurtingkids.com.